HDPLEX Fanless PC Case

A great htpc case! HDPLEX H1.S fanless PC case Amazon review and Facebook photo album

Amazon Review A great htpc case-HDPLEX H1.S fanless PC case
Facebook photo album
A great htpc case

I needed a case for a new HTPC/hi-fi streamer build. and as it’s going to sit in the lounge it needed to be silent and fit in with the rest of the equipment. Enter the hdplex h1.s which fits the bill perfectly. The build quality is top notch and having the choice of several different psus in a small case is an added bonus. Currently running with standard power but will be adding the 250w hi-fi psu and linear supply to complete the build.

A great HTPC case HDPLEX H1.S fanless pc case review

A great HTPC case HDPLEX H1.S fanless pc case review

A great HTPC case HDPLEX H1.S fanless pc case review

A great HTPC case HDPLEX H1.S fanless pc case review

A great HTPC case HDPLEX H1.S fanless pc case review

A great HTPC case HDPLEX H1.S fanless pc case review

HDPLEX 100W Linear Power Supply and H1.S fanless case with Italian DAC (Omega Audio Concepts) from Italy VideoHiFi Forum

Review Post from videohifi.com Forum Italy and here.

Regarding my Hi-Fi system, I can say, that the components HDPLEX,
were the best money spent!
With a fantastic care of materials, practical and with a fabulous design,
and very painstaking

an Intel i7 4790K (4Ghz, 88 TDP!!!)
You think, I bought a i7 4790T (2,7Ghz, 45 TDP),
and instead the seller sent me the 4790K,
Well, after downclocking at 2,7Ghz, and undervolting, work perfectly, after many hours of use, a rock, stable on 35/36 degrees!

These photos of the my Hi-Fi system:

1 & 5) H1.s with OS \ Music Player on stick USB
2) H1.s with OS \ Music Player on SSD
3 & 4) HDPLEX along with two chassis Italian DAC (Omega Audio Concepts)

HDPLEX 100W linear power supply Italy Videohifi Forum

HDPLEX 100W linear power supply Italy Videohifi Forum

HDPLEX 100W linear power supply Italy Videohifi Forum

HDPLEX 100W linear power supply Italy Videohifi Forum

HDPLEX 100W linear power supply Italy Videohifi Forum

HDPLEX fanless H1.S PC case from Amazon UK customer

Original Amazon UK review here.

As soon as you open the box you can tell that this is a quality product. each piece is laid out in its own packaging and is easily identifiable. This kit isn’t for the ‘new comers’ though, as the instructions are vague in places and you have to guess which screws to use. The build quality is fantastic, once all put together it looks like a premium piece of kit. This now sits perfectly under my lounge TV and is 100% silent. Coupled with the HD-Plex 160 ATX Converter power supply, and you can’t go wrong.

H1.S fanless PC case review from Amazon UK

H1.S fanless PC case review from Amazon UK

H1.S fanless PC case review from Amazon UK

HDPLEX 100W Linear Power Supply Feedback

Review from Head-Fi.Org Forum

I know you were directing the Linear PSU question to jtwrace, though I have some experience running the Gemini 2000 using a Regulated Linear PSU (R-Core) by HD-Plex

Costs $USD 358

To answer your question, yes their is.

I found a significant improvement to the Gemini 2000 by using a Linear PSU.
I listened for 10 minutes to the PSU and then the Auralic supplied laptop charger went straight into the cupboard.

The Gemini 2000 needs a 19V supply ( … that is what the Auralic supplied Toshiba laptop charger provides, 19V with approximately 4 amp capacity I believe.
Also it is important that the DC lead supplied with the PSU has a 2.5mm DC plug, that is what fits into the Gemini. So if you decide on getting a Linear PSU
it is essential that the cable’s plug can fit as well as it being essential that is 19V).

The HD-Plex has 4 independent rails , 5V, 9V, 12V, and 19V … with total capacity of 100W.

I use the 12V for my Vaunix USB Hub, the 19V is being used for the Gemini 2000.
100W is available from the HD-Plex … I tested the power draw of the Gemini 2000, with kill-a-watt … it only use’s 12W.
I wanted a Linear PSU with plenty of “power headroom”, with a capacity of at least 4 times what was being used.
The Vaunix Hub only use 1W, so along with the 12W drawn by the Gemini 2000, I am only drawing 13W of the available 100W from the HD-Plex.

I spent a lot of time investigating Linear PSU’s and I narrowed it down to a Linear PSU with at least 2 rails, with both 12V and 19V available.
I ruled out Paul Hynes which is very well thought of, mainly due to cost and wait times (his is probably the Rolls Royce of PSU’s), though I was looking at his best PSU which is nearing $1K I believe.
So with a budget of less than $1K …. the contenders were PPA (Paul Pang Audio) and HD-Plex.
Paul Pang products are also highly respected (like Paul Hynes and Teddy Pardo products), Paul Pangs PSU was about $599 shipped though I found it difficult to find much feedback on the web.

I liked the price of the HD-Plex ($358) … though the HD-Plex also had one feature that really appealed to me, that is it used an R-Core transformer.
I read the information Solude wrote on his website

https://diyaudioheaven.wordpress.com/tutorials/power-supplies/

from my understanding of reading this, R-Core transformers appeared better than Toroid transformers (in a PSU).
The HD-Plex PSU had a R-Core transformer so that is what influenced me to purchase it.
The other thing with Regulated Linear PSU’s to watch for is the amount of ripple (that is how good is the Regulators in the PSU).
The HD-Plex has very low ripple … plus they got it measured (as well as getting it CE approved).
It was a extremely close call between the PPA (due to his very good reputation) and the HD-Plex, though for the reasons above is why I went with HD-Plex.

One thing to note with HD-Plex was before I ordered on the HD-Plex website, I was unsure if the supplied XLR-to-DC plug lead had a 2.5mm DC plug… so I asked for an extra lead.
Larry from HD-Plex answered my query in 2 minutes and promised to send one (I just had to make a note of it in my order).
When the HD-Plex arrived, the standard XLR-to-DC cable only had a 2.1mm plug … it would not fit into the back of the Gemini.
Though the next day, a separate package arrived from HD-Plex and that cable was a XLR-to-DC cable with a 2.5mm DC plug , so I was able to now power the Gemini.
As an aside, Larry did not charge me for the extra cable and kept his word (supplying me with an extra cable, which had a 2.5mm DC plug), so I had a very good experience with his company.

To give some context on the degree this upgrade provided, I consider it significant.
My Audeze LCD3 got an overall improvement of about 30% better, when I upgraded from the DACmini CX (an affordable DAC/AMP which I highly respect) to the Auralic Gemini 2000.
Adding the Linear PSU improved the Gemini by another 30% IMO… it was just as important as doing the DAC/AMP upgrade.
The noise floor dropped further, wider soundstage, I heard more detail, more control, more clarity, better micro & macro dynamics and tone.
It pretty much just enhanced the improvements that I heard with upgrading to the Gemini.
It was a much more significant tweak than the Vaunix USB Hub powered by the Vaunix SMPS (though the Vaunix gave me better timing and PRAT, the Vaunix actually did scale up quite well once it was also powered by the HD-Plex, rather than using it’s SMPS wall wart. The Vaunix powered by the HD-Plex is now a definite keeper, a much better upgrade than say a HP cable upgrade.)

Anyway, that is the best I can articulate the improvements of providing a better power supply to the Gemini 2000.
It has been about a month now with using the HD-Plex …. though I wrote the following to a friend on Head-Fi a few days after getting the PSU…..

“Anyway , these are my chronicles of my “poor mans Vega/Taurus setup” (if I was to get a cost no object system, it would be that) … though by paying attention to power & USB & source , I actually wonder how close I have come to narrowing the gap of my “Lifestyle” product … I think I may actually be quite close, could potentially exceed it with the remaining tweaks. I wonder.

Going back to the HDPLEX, it was money very well spent.
The construction is superb, very solid.

Sound quality improvements … the widest soundstage ever from my LCD3 … surpass’s the HD800.
LCD3 now has pin point imaging of the HD800.
More controlled tuneful bass.
Hearing low level detail that I have never heard before (even though some of my songs I have been listening to since a teenager).
No mid range grain or treble glare (my pet hates) … unless it is in the recording.
Inflection (not sure of the audiophile term) … I think the human voice is the most powerful musical instrument, and the tone or inflection a singer selects to use is important to convey the emotion … anyway, the emotion is conveyed more effectively. I actually “get” more of the feeling the singer was trying to convey.
Complex or very dynamic music like orchestral … I use to notice that the LCD3 would lose control when on the DACmini on this type of music … though this issue is no more.
It is like the Auralic Gemini 2000/HDPLEX PSU combo has made the LCD3 it’s bitch.

At this stage I feel that all of the strengths of the HD800 have now been added to the LCD3 (sometimes superior to the HD800 as far as soundstaging / equal for imaging / equal for dynamics) … though the LCD3 strengths are even better due to the HDPLEX, as the LCD3 is now operating at it’s peak … with optimal power being provided to the Auralic Gemini 2000. I often only listen at 15 to 25 % volume, so really unsure of what the Auralic Taurus would offer as an upgrade even though it has more than double the power. So, out of all the tweaks I am extremely pleased with going for the HDPLEX (especially as I dithered between getting the Paul Pang Audio PSU and the HDPLEX for over a month … even though the HDPLEX is half the cost of the PPA PSU, I actually much more prefer the design of the HDPLEX from a sound quality perspective … that R-Core transformer type which more knowledgeable people than me seem to go crazy for. It’s built like a tank, released on November 15th in Hong Kong and arrived on November 18th in OZ).

HDPLEX H1.S Fanless PC case Keeps the CPU cooler than a fan! (feedback from Amazon)

Original Amazon Feedback

This is an exceptionally good case. I was absolutely blown away by how well it is designed and built, and the function is absolutely phenomenal.

I have had several Niveus fanless PC’s. They were great cases and had excellent thermo-regulation. The downside to the Niveus was cost – they were thousands of dollars. As they are no longer in production and several years old, I was looking around for a new fanless case. this was the only one I could find that looked like there was even 10 minutes worth of thought put into the design and function. It turns out that this is bar none the best thermo-regulating PC chassis available on the market today.

First, look at these numbers- I ran Prime95 stress test on three chassis: The HD-Plex H1.S, another Mini-ITX system with a CPU fan and case fan, and a Dell Precision M4800 laptop (workstation quality laptop). After 5 minutes, the processors in both the Dell and the Mini-ITX chassis were at 180 deg. F. Contrast that with the H1.S which was at only 170 deg. F after nearly 2 HOURS!!!. The ability of this chassis to move heat away from the processor and radiate it from the case fins is clearly superior to a standard CPU fan. I continued to run Prime95 for nearly 4 hours and the chassis stabilized at around 174 deg. F and never went higher.

This amazing thermo-regulation coupled with the fact this the computer was SILENT (no fan noise) really blows me away. I can not believe that there are not more fanless PC cases being built…This case should be marketed to more than just the high end media server crowd! After seeing these results I am considering switching my every day use desktop to this chassis.

The build spec I used follows:
HD-Plex H1.S fanless chassis w/ 120w AC/DC converter and 160w power supply combo
ASRock z97e-ITX mobo
Intel i3 4130T
Crucial Ballistics Sport RAM (2x4gb)
Samsung 850 1TB SSD

Geekbench 32-bit score of 6340

HDPLEX H10.SODD fanless PC case review from Russia

Original Russia Review link from ixbt Forum

Здравствуйте. Вот и я похвастаюсь. Наконец-то все собрал,HDPLEX H10.SODD,i5 4590, gigabyte z97n-wifi, 16gb ram, ssd 256 gb. bd привод еще не подключил, не могу найти переходник питания minisata . В простое температура cpu около 30 градусов, при запуске стресс теста поднимается до 60 градусов. В общем все отлично . Радуюсь полной тишине.

Hello. So I brag about. Finally all gathered. HDPLEX H110.SODD, i5 4590, gigabyte z97n-wifi, 16gb ram, ssd 256 gb. bd drive is not connected yet, I can not find the power adapter minisata. In simple cpu temperature of about 30 degrees, when you run the stress test rises to 60 degrees. In general, everything is fine. Rejoice in complete silence.

HDPLEX H10.SODD fanless PC case review from Russia

HDPLEX H10.SODD fanless PC case review from Russia

HDPLEX H10.SODD fanless PC case review from Russia

HDPLEX H10.SODD fanless PC case review from Russia

First glimpse of HDPLEX 2nd Gen full size flagship H5 fanless PC case

The second gen HDPLEX H5 fanless computer case will be HDPLEX’s new flagship full size case and will have many exciting features.

The first feature for 2nd Gen HDPLEX H5 fanless pc chassis is its eight-heatpipe passive heatsink system for CPU and graphic card.
The HDPLEX eight-heatpipe heatsink system for CPU and graphic card will be the best and most capable passive fanless PC heatsink system on the market.
Others similar solution only offer only 4- heatpipe which is lacking for high power TDP CPU such as intel core i7 4770k with 84W TDP.
The new eight-heatpipe HDPLEX CPU passive heatsink system could support 90W TDP CPU and use the right side panel of the H5 fanless chassis.
The eight heatpipe HDPLEX Graphic card/GPU passive heatsink system will be able to cool low-mid range graphic card such as GTX750.

HDPLEX 2nd Gen H5 fanless PC case eight heatpipe heatsink system

HDPLEX 2nd Gen H5 fanless PC case eight heatpipe heatsink system

HDPLEX 2nd Gen H5 fanless PC case eight heatpipe heatsink system

HDPLEX fanless H1.S pc case with ASRock Z97 ITX Intel i7-4790S Build

Build pictures from Facebook

Configuration
My newly built PC. No moving parts, small, completely silent and FAST.

Based on HD-Plex H1.S fanless pc chassis
Asrock Z97 MB,
Intel i7-4790S,
16GB RAM,
250GB SSD.
Fully boots in less than 15 seconds.

HDPLEX H1.S Fanless PC case with ASRock Z97 ITX and i7

HDPLEX H1.S Fanless PC case with ASRock Z97 ITX and i7

HDPLEX H1.S Fanless PC case with ASRock Z97 ITX and i7

HDPLEX H1.S Fanless PC case with ASRock Z97 ITX and i7

HDPLEX H1.S Fanless PC case with ASRock Z97 ITX and i7

HDPLEX fanless H1.S HTPC Case – Review from The Baker Blog

Original review from Chris Baker blog

I decided to build a new HTPC. I have been using the Zotac Zbox ID41-U for years as my HTPC which was working great except for the tiny CPU fan that had a high pitch whine that I couldn’t get rid of. I adjusted the fan thresholds in the BIOS which helped a bit, but not enough. The Zbox was turned on 24/7 so the sound could be grating when it was quiet in the living room. So I decided to seek out a completely silent solution. After doing some research I decided on the HDPLEX H1.S – a completely fanless case capable of housing a Mini-ITX or Thin Mini-ITX motherboard. I chose the Gigabyte H97N-Wifi because it has dual ethernet ports so if I retire the box as my HTPC it could make for a very beefy and silent router/UTM. The Intel Core i3-4130T consumes 19W less power than the regular i3 4130 and doesn’t sacrifice much in the way of performance. It will create less heat and with the Intel integrated graphics on the chip it can easily handle 1080p video playback and more.

SPECS:

Case: HDPLEX H1.S
Additional Case Components:

120W Internal 19V AC-DC Fanless Power Supply
160W DC-ATX Converter
Internal IR Receiver
CPU: Intel Core i3-4130T (35W low power model)
Motherboard: Gigabyte H97N-WIFI (Mini-ITX)
RAM: Crucial CT102464BA160B 8GB DDR3
HDD: Mushkin Enhanced Chronos MKNSSDCR120GB 2.5″ 120GB SATA III SSD

PROS:

Completely Silent
Nice minimal design – no annoying LEDs or obnoxious logos.
The case disperses heat from the CPU well – temperatures consistently range from 45-50 degrees Celsius. There is very little temperature fluctuation from idle to load. (The max recommended operating temp for the Intel Core i3-4130T is 73 degrees Celsius.)
The customer service from HDPLEX was very good, I would often get a courteous response in a few hours to my support requests.
Quality parts – the case is all metal and sturdy. No scratches, blemishes or poor workmanship anywhere to be found.
Case comes well packaged with the multitude of screws and other parts in several different zip bags. Each bag appears to be logically separated by assembly step – although I’m just speculating as there was nothing stated in the manual to indicate this was the case.
Also included is a velour bag filled with various parts.
Comes with an injection tube of thermal paste – enough for the whole project and then some.
I was surprised to find a small hex screwdriver included as some of the screws are hex bit.

CONS:

The instructions aren’t detailed enough. The instructions would just say assemble this or assemble that without any details about which of the various included screws or parts to use. There are included pictures, but they are too small or at the wrong angle to help with figuring out the screw types. I’ve built a lot of PCs before so it wasn’t too difficult to figure out. For someone new to building though this might be an exercise in frustration. What didn’t help with the screw confusion was there were a lot of left over parts – for many of them I have no idea what they are for. I was often left wondering if I had used the right screws or not and in some cases I hadn’t, so I had to rearrange them after the fact. Some of the instructions in the installation manual were very vague making for some perplexing head scratching moments. For example on page 5, there is a picture that says, “Use bottom holder to avoid conflict with motherboard components”. I have no idea what that means or what the picture is supposed to indicate. There is an arrow pointing to a bare silver mounting peg(?), but in the same picture in same type of hole is the standard backplate rubber mounting peg – so which am I supposed to use? There is only this one picture and one sentence that references this peg. I went with the rubber pegs as they had the sticky double sided backing on them for easy installation.
For such a streamlined case, the internal IR receiver stands out as it isn’t tightly integrated into the case. The receiver sticks out of the bottom on a small circuit board. After installation, it interfered with my Microsoft MCE USB IR receiver. I would get double presses or it would seem to steal my remote presses and nothing would happen. So I had to uninstall it, which is not a big deal to me as it might be handy in the future if I use the PC for something else where I want to use the internal IR from HDPLEX and not the USB IR receiver. Also, the screw that came with the IR receiver to mount the chip to the bottom of the case was way too long. When screwed in, it prevented the front plate from being able to attach to the case properly. So it had to be removed and put in as the last step which was a hassle when disassembling and reassembling the case multiple times. If the screw didn’t jut into the body of the case this wouldn’t be a problem.
Another instructions annoyance were the directions to spread thermal paste on the side grooves of the case where the CPU heat pipes will contact. The grooves run the entire length of the case sides. The heat pipes from the CPU will only touch one third of the side panels on either side so I ended up wasting a bunch of thermal paste. Luckily, I had just enough left for the CPU plate. Since everything inside the case is so compact, cables and other parts started to get mucked up with the excess thermal paste. I had to use cotton swabs with rubbing alcohol to clean the thermal paste out of the unused groove space. The instructions only tell you after you spread the thermal paste where the heat pipes will actually sit.
The 4 pin cable for SATA power from the DC-ATX converter didn’t seat properly because the connector’s plastic clip (that holds the connector in securely) would hit against some other cable shielding. For my initial assembly the SATA power cable came loose and my HDD wouldn’t power on, so I had to disassemble, force it in, and clip little bits of the shielding off the other cables to get it to fit correctly. These were all parts supplied by HDPLEX so they should all fit together without modification.

SUMMARY:

I would definitely recommend this case to an experienced case builder. If you’re new to case building I would think twice – it’s not a standard build due to the CPU heat pipe installation and the instructions certainly don’t hand hold you through the process. Once I had it all put together I was very pleased with the aesthetics of the case, the thermal dissipation, and silence.

HDPLEX Fanless H1.S HTPC case review

HDPLEX Fanless H1.S HTPC case review

HDPLEX Fanless H1.S HTPC case review

HDPLEX Fanless H1.S HTPC case review

HDPLEX Fanless H1.S HTPC case review

HDPLEX Fanless H1.S HTPC case review

HDPLEX Fanless H1.S HTPC case review

HDPLEX Fanless H1.S HTPC case review

HDPLEX fanless H1.S PC Case Kaveri Build

Original Review from HDPLEX fanless Computer Forum

Hi there! Just sharing this build for your inspiration. I played a while with the idea of trying an AMD kaveri apu, but was sick of whirring fans and cases that are bigger than my screen. Therefore, after some research for components, the HDPlex H1.S seemed perfect for my needs:

HDPLEX H1.S Fanless mini ITX PC case
Gigabyte F2A88XN-Wifi
AMD A8-7600
4GiB GSkill RipJawsX (leftover from previous build)
64GiB OCZ Vertex3 (idem)

The gigabyte motherboard has it 24pin on the side, so I went with the 2/4 heatpipe configuration instead of 3 each way. The USB3.0 cable of the HS.1 had a soldering fault, but HDPlex is sending a new one and I have no haste since the motherboard also has two. Btw: I used some Arctic Silver MX4 instead of the paste that came with the case. The “barbell” for applying it isn’t very convenient, but does the job. Remember to put good pressure on it, both when applying as when fastening the heatpipes.

For power supply I ordered the 120W internal AC-DC converter and the 160W DC-ATX adapter, which would seem to suffice since I did not need any extension cards. However, halfway through installing the OS, the converter failed (blown capacitor?). Whether this was overloaded or a fabrication fault I don’t know, but HDPlex was so kind to refund it. Now I’m using only the DC-ATX adapter and provide power with an old 19V laptop psu. Works perfectly!

Haven’t been doing 3D rendering, but day-long work playing music and video doesn’t heat the case above touching-ability. I wonder if it can be put under de foot of my screen; perhaps with some room above the air gaps in the case top? Anyway, here are some pictures:

HDPLEX H1.S Fanless PC Kaveri Build

HDPLEX H1.S Fanless PC Kaveri Build

HDPLEX H1.S Fanless PC Kaveri Build

HDPLEX H1.S Fanless PC Kaveri Build

HDPLEX H1.S Fanless PC Kaveri Build

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